The Gambling Commission website uses cookies to make the site work better for you. Some of these cookies are essential to how the site functions and others are optional. Optional cookies help us remember your settings, measure your use of the site and personalise how we communicate with you. Any data collected is anonymised and we do not set optional cookies unless you consent.

Set cookie preferences

You've accepted all cookies. You can change your cookie settings at any time.

Skip to main content
This is new
Is this page helpful?

Betway to pay £11.6m for failings linked to 'VIP' customers

Online gambling business Betway is to pay £11.6 million, as well as implementing a package of measures, for a series of social responsibility and money laundering failings linked to dealings with seven of its high spending customers.

In one instance, the operator failed to carry out source of funds checks on a ‘VIP’ customer who deposited over £8 million and lost over £4 million during a four-year period. In another, they failed to carry out effective social responsibility interactions with a customer who deposited and lost £187,000 in two days.

The investigation found that as a result of a lack of consideration of individual customers affordability and source of funds checks, the operator allowed £5.8 million of money to flow through the business which has been found, or could reasonably be suspected to be, proceeds of crime. The majority of this money will now be taken and returned to victims.

The regulator probe also revealed inadequate management oversight and investigations into responsible Personal Management Licence holders are ongoing.

Richard Watson, Executive Director at the Gambling Commission, said: “The actions of Betway suggest there was little regard for the welfare of its VIP customers or the impact on those around them.”

He said: “As part of our ongoing programme of work to make gambling safer we are pushing the industry to make rapid progress on the areas that we consider will have the most significant impact to protect consumers. The treatment and handling of high value customers is a significant piece of that work and operators are in no doubt about the need to tackle the issue at speed.

“We have set tight deadlines for when we expect to see progress and if we do not see the right results then we will have no choice but to take further action. This case highlights again why progress needs to be made.”

Last October Gambling Commission Chief Executive Neil McArthur set the industry tough challenges as part of a drive to make gambling in safer in Britain. One of those challenges focused on the incentivisation of high value customers.

Industry-led working groups, supported by the Betting and Gaming Council, are also focusing on ethical game design and the use of advertising technology.

Previous page
Three senior manager departures and £13m sanction at Caesars
Next page
Mr Green to pay £3m for regulatory failures